Top Democrats call for "no rush" toward impeachment

Similarly, Dick Durbin, the Senate Democratic whip, echoed her sentiments. In a separate briefing with reporters, he said he had told colleagues to not expect any impeachment to happen for a while, if at all.
By Ian Marsh | May 29, 2017
It's no secret that impeachment proceeding against President Trump have been a much-discussed possibility in the last few weeks. And a chorus of Democratic lawmakers, including 23 House Democrats and three Democratic senators, have all said that they would be open to formally starting the process. But upper echelons of the Democratic establishment are not yet sold: Sen. Cory Booker (D-NJ), House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, and other high-profile Democrats have urged extreme caution on the topic.

"I'm not going to rush to impeachment," Booker (D-N.J.) said Sunday on CNN's "State of the Union. "I think we need to deal with this in a very sobered way."

Pelosi, speaking to reporters in a press briefing last week, similarly discouraged fast action. She told her audience that she would advise her colleagues to get all the facts first and take time to determine if there actually are grounds for impeachment.

"I hope some would curb their enthusiasm until we have all of the facts and have confidence that when the American people understand what is there, whether it's grounds for impeachment or grounds for disappointment, then they'll know," she said.

Similarly, Dick Durbin, the Senate Democratic whip, echoed her sentiments. In a separate briefing with reporters, he said he had told colleagues to not expect any impeachment to happen for a while, if at all.

"I been talking to the base since November the 9th and telling them this is a marathon, it's not a sprint," he said. "We have an orderly process in our government. We're going to follow it. They don't like to hear it, but I think that's the facts."

Senate and House committees are holding upcoming hearings pursuant to their ongoing investigations into whether Trump officials have improper ties to Russia and colluded with Russia during the 2016 elections. Any impeachment would require widespread Republican defections, since it cannot pass unless it garners a two-thirds majority in the Senate.

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