Ex-Guantanamo detainee who killed U.S. soldier in combat faces legal challenge from soldier's family

The widow filed an application to receive the payout instead.
By Lucas Rowe | Jul 08, 2017
Canada's plan to pay $10.5 million to Omar Khadr, a former Guantanamo Bay detainee, is facing a lawsuit from the widow of an American soldier whom Khadr allegedly killed in Afghanistan. The widow filed an application to receive the payout instead.
Khadr was 15 years old when U.S. troops in Afghanistan caught him after a firefight in which U.S. Army medic SFC Christopher Speer died and U.S. Army Sgt. Layne Morris lost an eye. Khadr's captors took him to Guantanamo, where a military commission charged him with murder. He pleaded guilty in 2010 but later retracted his confession, saying that he made the confession because he thought it was his only chance of getting out of Guantanamo Bay.
Canadian personnel participated in the interrogations, and a Canadian court consequently ruled in 2010 that Canada owed Khadr $10.5 million in redress. Khadr is now living freely in Canada and is studying to become an emergency medical responder.
But a U.S. judge ruled in 2015 that Khadr must pay Morris and Tabitha Speer, Speer's widow, $134.2 million in damages. Don Winder, a lawyer representing Morris and Speer, said that he will go after the promised Canadian government payout.
He also said on Tuesday that he has filed an application several weeks ago to have a Canadian court enforce the U.S. judge's ruling. His application has not yet gotten a court hearing, however.
"We will be proceeding with that application and trying to make sure that if he gets money it goes to the widow of Sgt. Speer and Layne Morris for the loss of an eye," Winder told the Associated Press.

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